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How is it going (18/06/22 21:40:18) Reply
    Frighteningly disturbing...

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2022/jun/18/children-stressed-and-self-harming-uk-cost-of-living-crisis-childhood-trust
rf

Re: How is it going (18/06/22 21:48:05) Reply
    the impact of the "current crisis" is certainly going to affect at least 2/3 generations.

    we as species have been very resilient, but I think more and more there is this dependency on the system which I'm not sure it's healthy. Shouldn't we push people to be self reliant?
    Excuse the ramble

    rf
rf

Re: Re: How is it going is it worth it (19/06/22 16:51:34) Reply
    So the question is, is this conflict worth it? Sure there has been a financial down turn, and covid and now the conflict.

    But IMO as a country and people we would benefit from a negotiated peace already. From the sidelines it seems a negotiated truce is something we are avoiding even Ukraine leadership is against a negotiated truce with concessions...
rf

Rewarding crime? (19/06/22 17:45:44) Reply
    I don't believe Putin and his successors will have ambitions that stop anywhere before Lisboa. The exacerbated poverty of the English poor is Putin's war against all of us. A Russian victory in Ukraine will just be a stimulus to more Russian aggression - once their armed forces have recuperated (which I hope they never will thanks to sanctions).

    (If you saw banknotes from the Soviet Union - with the world map decorated with a hammer and sickle, it was obvious that that country did not have peaceful intentions. No wonder it was forbidden to take Soviet banknotes out of the country.)

    The good old days will not return unless Putin is made to lose big time, when the wrecked Ukrainian cities and villages, roads and railroads are rebuilt, and the corn fields are cleared of landmines and unexploded bombs and projectiles.

    And probably not then either. In Ukraine there is great demand for used electric cars because petrol and diesel are severely rationed. Norway is a place to go for buyers.
    https://elbil.no/om-elbil/elbilstatistikk/elbilbestand/

    For comparison: UK
    https://heycar.co.uk/blog/electric-cars-statistics-and-projections

    Putin's war may have been the end of affordable fossil energy in Europe. If UK does not improve her act in social matters, I predict that there will be a new generation of writers taking up the thread where Dickens left.
e

more q than answers (20/06/22 06:07:16) Reply
    a good ramble is always welcomed. at least by me ;)

    >> the impact of the "current crisis" is certainly going to affect at least 2/3 generations.
    >> we as species have been very resilient,

    assumptions. ill go along though.

    >> but I think more and more there is this dependency on the system which I'm not sure it's healthy.

    i agree. depends on how you define that dependency.

    >> Shouldn't we push people to be self reliant?

    sounds lovely, how would we go about doing that?
    self reliant in what way? in context of the welfare system or economy or what exactly?

    >> So the question is, is this conflict worth it?

    absolutely yes.
    this is not just about ukraine. in fact its less about ukraine and more about challenging the world order without a plan or a backup (or at least none that can be seen for now besides relying on the world's weakness)
    so for a change, i stand with the word order and tell the other side like i would a toddler: take a time out or learn to "play nice".

    >> From the sidelines it seems a negotiated truce is something we are avoiding even Ukraine leadership is against a negotiated truce with concessions...

    can you seriously imagine a scenario that both parties could agree on?

    in my opinion, there is a fine line between negotiating and giving in to extortion.

    in fact, i think putin has all of us exactly where he wants us. the next move possible can and will be his and his alone. best troll ever. i can expand on this (pretty obvious)


    i am quite interested to hear you expand on my questions though, or else im afraid i cant comment more than i did already. tia.


    ps.

    im with e on the UK part of things. dickens.
    a serious social and political reform is long over due over there imo.
    most of these structures managed to endure and happily survive the 60s :(
jm

One word first, if I can find a suitable one. (19/06/22 16:54:28) Reply
    Brutal, perhaps. Maybe UK isn't worse than others - but I am not willing to bet on it. From what I know of history of the UK, this has centuries-deep roots, with almighty rich rulers and poor people with no power and minimal rights.

    Poverty is a punishment, but mainly for being born into a lower socioeconomic stratum.

    UK could start with the voting system for representatives to the House of Commons
    https://www.parliament.uk/about/how/elections-and-voting/voting-systems/
    "At a general or local election, voters put a cross (X) next to their preferred candidate on a ballot paper. Ballot papers are counted. The candidate with the most votes represents the constituency or ward."
    In more honest words it would be: The Winner Takes All.


    For a long-term solution a change of the voting system would be needed

    https://www.parliament.uk/site-information/glossary/proportional-representation/

    Then there could be a vocal opposition with more representative representatives.

    For the short term - sell off the properties of the Russian oligarchs and use it for selective, easy-to-administer support of the needy (not only the neediest).

    An extra tax on really high incomes (in contrast to the
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poll_tax
    instituted by Thatcher, and very much revealing her attitude towards the non-owning classes).

    My impression is that for a view of English social policies I could just reread Dickens' Oliver Twist.
e


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